University of Maine, Michael Klahr Holocaust Resource Center
Augusta, ME

For many years, artifacts, mementos, tapes and other materials belonging to State of Mainers who survived or helped to liberate the concentrations camps of the World War II era, were scattered about the state in various locations including a private home. A new 6,000 sf education and resource center has recently been built at the University of Maine Augusta. The new center was built with the help of the Holocaust Human Rights Center of Maine and thanks to a generous donation by Michael Klahr who survived the holocaust as a child. In the new center, which is attached to the University library, researchers will find a rich archive of reference material. In the Klahr Center, seminars and symposiums will focus on the topics of diversity, medical ethics and the Holocaust.

Syska Hennessy Group and Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott won an international competition of 120 entries for their design concept for the new Klahr Center. Their design is based on a flower with its petals opening and reaching upward, a symbol of life and renewal. The architects, Hon and Wooten, said in their design proposal, "they sought to project the center's mission to hold and direct light. Dispelling the darkness that troubles the human spirit, the Center's glassy petals shine forth, creating a light-filled meditative and educational space." Syska engineers helped design the specialty lighting for the classrooms as well as the exhibits. In addition, Syska engineers provided MEP/FP and partial tel/data for the resource center's new systems as well as the interconnection between these new systems and the school's existing systems.

For many years, artifacts, mementos, tapes and other materials belonging to State of Mainers who survived or helped to liberate the concentrations camps of the World War II era, were scattered about the state in various locations including a private home. A new 6,000 sf education and resource center has recently been built at the University of Maine Augusta. The new center was built with the help of the Holocaust Human Rights Center of Maine and thanks to a generous donation by Michael Klahr who survived the holocaust as a child. In the new center, which is attached to the University library, researchers will find a rich archive of reference material. In the Klahr Center, seminars and symposiums will focus on the topics of diversity, medical ethics and the Holocaust.

Syska Hennessy Group and Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott won an international competition of 120 entries for their design concept for the new Klahr Center. Their design is based on a flower with its petals opening and reaching upward, a symbol of life and renewal. The architects, Hon and Wooten, said in their design proposal, "they sought to project the center's mission to hold and direct light. Dispelling the darkness that troubles the human spirit, the Center's glassy petals shine forth, creating a light-filled meditative and educational space." Syska engineers helped design the specialty lighting for the classrooms as well as the exhibits. In addition, Syska engineers provided MEP/FP and partial tel/data for the resource center's new systems as well as the interconnection between these new systems and the school's existing systems.

Size:

7,000 sf