Long Beach Airport Terminal Expansion
Phase I Improvements
Long Beach, CA

The Long Beach Airport is a small single terminal airport noted for its ‘Streamline Moderne’ style of architecture and is an historical landmark. Because of the age and limited size of the current terminal, the City of Long Beach needed to modernize and expand the passenger terminal and address increased airport security requirements. The Terminal Expansion project is part of a larger airport modernization effort that includes new passenger on-site parking structure, airside pavement and utility upgrades and the addition of two aircraft parking positions. These projects will help the airport accommodate about 4.2 million passengers annually after its anticipated completion in 2011, up from the 3 million it handles now.

As part of the design team, Syska Hennessy Group was contracted to provide engineering services, including design of the photovoltaic and public address system for the expansion. Phase I of the Terminal Expansion includes a new 13,000 sf south holdroom structure and 24,700 sf north holdroom structure with a connecting courtyard. The holdroom structures include passenger amenities such as concessions, restrooms and passenger waiting areas. In addition the project also includes a new 7000 sf passenger screening building that meets current TSA requirements. The future Phase II of the Terminal Expansion may continue the terminal modernization with new in-line baggage screening equipment and Airport Administration Offices.

The building systems were designed to support achieving LEED certification under LEED 3.0 and includes a 50kW roof mounted solar photovoltaic system which should offset approximately 14% of the terminal’s annual energy use. The project is also pursuing incentives the Southern California Edison’s Savings By Design and will exceed California Energy Standard Title 24 by 24%.

Syska’s team utilized Revit MEP 2010 to create all designs and final construction documents for enhanced collaboration between disciplines, as well as for system clash detection. Additionally, the Revit geometric model proved useful in our environmental analysis using EcoTect in assisting in the development of external louvers, light shelves to maximize useable daylight and views to the airplanes and runways and minimizing direct sun and glare.

  • Courtesy of HOK
  • Courtesy of HOK
  • Courtesy of HOK
  • Courtesy of HOK
  • Courtesy of HOK

Size:

60,000 sf

Awards:

2013 Aviation Project of the Year - The California Transportation Foundation